How to Blog a Book http://howtoblogabook.com Inspiring You to Build Visibility, Boost Authority and Become an Author Post by Post Thu, 23 Apr 2015 07:33:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=188Inspiring You to Build Visibility, Boost Authority and Become an Author Post by Post How to Blog a Book no Inspiring You to Build Visibility, Boost Authority and Become an Author Post by Post How to Blog a Book http://howtoblogabook.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpghttp://howtoblogabook.com Blog a Book Because It’s Your Turnhttp://howtoblogabook.com/blog-a-book-because-its-your-turn/ http://howtoblogabook.com/blog-a-book-because-its-your-turn/#respond Thu, 23 Apr 2015 07:25:28 +0000 http://howtoblogabook.com/?p=5568 National Book Blogging Month (NaBoBloMo) is more than half over. At this point, you might feel the lag that happens mid-way through a project. Doubt sets in. Writing gets harder. You get bored, lose focus and wonder if you’ll finish. Also, if your blogged-book project hasn’t generated as much readership or engagement as you hoped, […]

The post Blog a Book Because It’s Your Turn appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>
take your turn by blogging a book
© Qualityrenders | Dreamstime.com

National Book Blogging Month (NaBoBloMo) is more than half over. At this point, you might feel the lag that happens mid-way through a project. Doubt sets in. Writing gets harder. You get bored, lose focus and wonder if you’ll finish. Also, if your blogged-book project hasn’t generated as much readership or engagement as you hoped, you may wonder why you bothered to blog a book in a month.

Stop it.

Many good reasons exist for you to start—and to finish—your blogged book. On this blog I’ve offered 10 good reasons to blog a book. Here’s another reason, which probably is the most important one: It’s your turn.

That’s right. It’s your turn to share your message, to be read, to make a difference, to publish your book, to become an expert, to do your dream.

What to Do When It's Your TurnI recently read Seth Godin’s newest book, What to Do When It’s Your Turn (and it’s always your turn). Every page encouraged me to get off my butt and do the things I knew I was meant to do both personally and professionally in this lifetime—to take my turn. To grab the opportunity and run with it!

I literally felt pushed to fulfill my purpose. I’d like you to feel that way. (Read his book!)

Godin is right: The time to take your turn is now…always…every moment. (Do you know if you’ll have the opportunity tomorrow, the next day, next week, or next month?) That’s why you need to finish your blogged book before NaBoBloMo ends.

How to Take Your Turn

As a blogger and a writer, you can take your turn easily. Don’t wait for permission to write what’s in your heart or on your mind. Start blogging your book today, this moment (if you didn’t start April 1 or at some earlier date). Write your book post by post, and publish it. No need to get your book formatted and uploaded to Kindle—or for Amazon to give you the green flag to sell that book. Start “selling” it from your blog the moment you start writing it.

There’s no waiting if you take your turn as a blogger. You can ship your book today…day by day. Sell your course today…session by session; register your readers and send them content via a page on your site or your email autoresponder system. It’s that fast. It’s that easy.

Will You Take Your Turn?

It’s up to you. Only you. No one else can take you turn for you.

If you started the NaBoBloMo challenge, don’t stop because you don’t have enough readers or people commenting on your posts. Maybe it’s not their turn, or their time, to read your message. But it is your time to share it.

If you blog it, readers will comeKeep writing. Keep blogging. Just like in The Field of Dreams, when you take your turn, “they (readers) will come.”

Continue writing even if you think you don’t have enough to say. Just say what you set out to say. It will be enough. And don’t allow yourself to believe that no one wants to read what you write. Write it, and someone will read it.

Decide that now is the right time…or that you have enough time. Now is the only time that exists. The past and the future are figments of your imagination.

You have eight more days to finish your blogged book as part of the NaBoBloMo challenge. It’s your turn…to finish what you started.

And then it will be your turn to start a new blog post or a new blogged book—to continue sharing your message with the world.

Will you take your turn? Leave me a comment that includes your commitment to do so.

The post Blog a Book Because It’s Your Turn appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>
http://howtoblogabook.com/blog-a-book-because-its-your-turn/feed/ 0
Is Your Blog Mobile Friendly?http://howtoblogabook.com/is-your-blog-mobile-friendly/ http://howtoblogabook.com/is-your-blog-mobile-friendly/#respond Tue, 21 Apr 2015 07:15:42 +0000 http://howtoblogabook.com/?p=5546 Can your visitors read your blogged book on their mobile devices? If it isn’t “mobile-friendly,” you will lose readers—in more ways than one. Readers click away from your site, and, as of today, Google will make it harder for them to show up on your site at all if it’s too difficult to access via […]

The post Is Your Blog Mobile Friendly? appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>
mobile-friendly blog
© dubova – Fotolia.com

Can your visitors read your blogged book on their mobile devices? If it isn’t “mobile-friendly,” you will lose readers—in more ways than one. Readers click away from your site, and, as of today, Google will make it harder for them to show up on your site at all if it’s too difficult to access via a cell phone or tablet.

Increasingly, people read everything on their mobile devices. Just look at the data from www.comscore.com, which shows how mobile internet usage has skyrocketed in just the past four years.

digital_media_time_spent_chart_referenceDo Your Readers Use Mobile Devices?

To find out how many of your readers access your blog via a mobile device, check your analytics program. Most programs provide you with this information. If you use Google Analytics, click on the “Audience” section. Then select “Mobile > Overview.” This screen provides you with information on the amount of traffic your blog receives from a mobile device. Switch to the pie chart view to see the percentage of your site’s traffic that comes via mobile.

Still on the Google Analytics site, under “Devices” you can drill down to discover which mobile devices your visitors use.

If you have a lot of mobile users, you need what is called a mobile-responsive website. Keep this in mind: Your current low number of mobile users could be caused by your site’s lack of mobile-responsiveness or mobile-friendliness at this time. A mobile-friendly website displays correctly or legibly on hand-held mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets.

The New Google Update and Your Site

The rise in mobile readership has caused Google to put this factor into its new algorithm, which goes into effect today. If your site is not mobile friendly, it will get downgraded in the search engine results pages (SERPs).

You don’t want that to happen! You’ve worked long and hard to build up your traffic and your place in the SERPs. So what can you do? Find out if your site is mobile-responsive or not.

How to Test your Blog for Mobile Responsiveness

First, test your site by viewing and interacting with it from a variety of mobile devices (iPhone, iPad, Samsung Galaxy, etc.). How does it look? Is it easy to read? Does it resize to the device’s screen? If so, your blog is mobile responsive.

You also can use Google’s Mobile Guide, which lets you test your mobile website for mobile compatibility. To test your site, go to the Mobile-Friendly Test page, enter in your website address (URL), and click “Analyze.”

I tried it with my Write Nonfiction NOW! site, and here’s what I got:

PastedGraphic

Super! However, when I entered the URL for this site, How to Blog a Book, I got this:

PastedGraphic1
The reason is simple: Write Nonfiction NOW! uses a mobile-responsive theme. How to Blog a Book does not…or didn’t. Notice that today the site is sporting a new look that is mobile responsive! (We implemented this quickly, but you will see a full redesign over the next week or two.) If I tested it again, the result would be different; the site would pass. (Try it yourself!)

Also, notice that Google provides you with a guide to improving your site. You can click on the “next” button under “Make this site mobile-friendly” to get it.

How to Make Your Blog Mobile Responsive

The easiest, and the most-effective, way to make your blog mobile responsive is to choose a mobile-optimized theme and redesign the site with this theme. WordPress has many mobile-optimized themes you can download for free. Plus, most premium themes today have this feature.

What did I do to this site? I had my developer choose a new theme. We changed little else. I have a plan to redesign anyway because of the release of the second edition of How to Blog a Book. I want to brand the site with the new colors and update for the book release, so I might use a totally different theme in the coming weeks (but I sort of like the clean look we got with this one). The Google update just pushed my redesign plans along a little faster.

But what if you don’t have time to redesign your blog—after all, the Google update went into effect today? No worries. There are still some things you can do.

Since the Google algorithm will roll out on a page-by-page basis in real time, you can “fix” your most important pages first. Barry Schwartz reported in a post published by the Search Engine Roundtable, that “immediately when they do go mobile-friendly, as soon as Google picks up on it, those pages will benefit from the algorithm.”

In a guest post published on Social Media Just for Authors Paula Gregorowicz, a website designer and life and business strategist, offered two additional WordPress alternatives:

  • Use a mobile friendly plugin to deliver a stripped down version of your site to mobile devices. (Click here to read a post by Gregorowicz that recommends two plugins.)
  • Retrofit your existing design/theme so it becomes mobile friendly. This option involves changing existing code and can be a big job.

All Your Readers Aren’t Lost

If you site is not mobile responsive today, it’s not the end of your blog or your readers. You have a little time and a few options, some of which are not too costly, to help you get your site ready for mobile readers.

And don’t fault Google. Sixty-three percent of adults use their phone to go online, according to  the Pew Research Institute. Don’t you think a huge number of your readers might do the same or want to? Of course. Google is just pushing you to do something necessary if you want your blog to remain current with the trends.

Accept the fact that now is the time to make your site mobile-responsive or to create a mobile-friendly blog (if you are just starting out). Be “friendly” to all your potential mobile readers so you gain your share of them. And do so to keep your existing mobile readers rather than losing that share as well.

The post Is Your Blog Mobile Friendly? appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>
http://howtoblogabook.com/is-your-blog-mobile-friendly/feed/ 0
Become an Influencer with a Blog and a Bookhttp://howtoblogabook.com/how-to-become-an-influencer-online-and-off/ http://howtoblogabook.com/how-to-become-an-influencer-online-and-off/#respond Thu, 16 Apr 2015 08:51:53 +0000 http://howtoblogabook.com/?p=5531 Anyone who spends time in social networks has heard about them. We know we are supposed to follow them. We want them to follow us back. We want to become like them. Who are they? Influencers. They are the people on Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus, LinkedIn, and Pinterest (even Instagram) with the ginormous followings. They […]

The post Become an Influencer with a Blog and a Book appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>
Photo courtesy of mybaitshop | Stockfresh.com
Photo courtesy of mybaitshop | Stockfresh.com

Anyone who spends time in social networks has heard about them. We know we are supposed to follow them. We want them to follow us back. We want to become like them. Who are they? Influencers.

They are the people on Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus, LinkedIn, and Pinterest (even Instagram) with the ginormous followings. They are the ones whose status updates are shared by everyone. Like the famous advertisement slogan for E.F. Hutton, when they talk, “people to listen.” They have Klout. They share valuable information, and we want to read it. We want to know what they think. We want to know their opinions. And their opinions influence what we think and believe and sometimes even how we act.

But why are these social media users influencers? That’s the real question. And here’s the answer: They have something to say that is worth listening to, something worth reading, something that impacts us at an emotional or personal level.

Authors are Influencers

Yet, another group of people serve as influencers in the same way: authors. Write a nonfiction book, and you become an author expert. You become the authority on your topic. Authors get interviewed on the radio and on the television as well as in newspapers and magazines. When they speak, people listen. They have clout. They are influencers.

Bloggers are Influencers

Know something else? If you are a blogger, you also can become an influencer. You can develop authority just by blogging. You can become an authority blogger, as Chris Garrett, coauthor of Problogger and founder of the course Authority Blogger, says. This is especially true if you blog about a particular area of expertise or any area you know a lot about.

A few years ago, technorati.com conducted a survey and found that:

  • 56 percent of all bloggers say their blog has helped them establish a position as a thought leader within an industry.
  • 58 percent say they are better-known in their industry because of their blog.

Here’s some interesting information: Most of the influencers on social networks have successful blogs. They have posts shared widely. That means they “reach” beyond just their immediate circle of influence.

No one knew me as an expert or thought leader on the topic of blogging books until I began my blog, How to Blog a Book. After five months of blogging on the topic, however, my site had #1 Google search engine results page ranking, I began speaking at writing conferences about blogging books, and I began guest posting on the subject on more popular blogs than mine. Not only that, I landed a traditional publishing contract. After blogging about boys who want to become professional dancers for several years on my own blog, My Son Can Dance, I started to be asked to write articles on the topic for some of the top magazines in the dance industry and to write a monthly column for a membership website.

Know something else? Most influencers on social networks are authority bloggers and expert authors. They have written and published a book.

Boost Your Authority with a Blog AND a Book

You can boost your authority quotient by becoming both an author and a blogger. You can do this simply by blogging a book.

Let me clarify what I mean. I’m not talking about “booking a blog,” which means repurposing your old blog posts into a book. You can do that and end up with a book. That’s fine; at the end of the day you’ll still become an author expert. (And if you already enjoy expert status and are seen as an influencer in your industry, booking your blog makes total sense!) However, that methodology takes a fair amount of effort, especially if you’ve blogged for a long time and have a lot of posts through which to pilfer.

I’m talking about writing your book from scratch on your blog—post by post—so you end up with a book you can self-publish. If you do this successfully, you might, however, also end up with a traditional publishing deal. (An agent or publisher might discover you and your blog.) You also can lay the groundwork for a very successful self-published book.

The Blogged Book Process

As I said, the process is simple, and I’ve written about it here at length…but not for a long time. So I’ll repeat the steps in a condensed manner:

  1. Map out your content; do a brain dump (or a mind map) of all the subjects you might cover in your book.
  2. Organize the subjects into a content plan, table of contents or outline.
  3. Decide on “extra” content you will add to the printed or ebook version and that you will not publish on your blog; this provides an incentive to your blog readers to purchase the final version of the book.
  4. Break your content plan, or chapters, down into post-sized bits (300-500 words); create subheadings or titles for all the bits of content that constitute posts and will fill each chapter.
  5. Create a publishing schedule—preferably a minimum of twice a week, but more is better. The best is seven days a week; aim for three to five days per week.
  6. Compose your posts in a word processing program or Scrivener following your content plan sequentially so you create a manuscript. Do this on schedule (see step #3).
  7. Copy and paste your posts into your blogging program on schedule and publish them (see step #3).
  8. Share your posts on your social networks.

Of course, use good social networking practices. For each post you publish, be sure to converse with your followers, offer other useful information, retweet relevant information, etc.

Increase Your Influence During NaBloLoMo

If you follow the seven steps above, in a fairly short amount of time, you will complete the first draft of your book. I wrote 26,300 words in five months posting three to four times per week. When I was finished, How to Blog a Book contained more than double the number of words found in that first draft here on the blog. (Now it’s been revised and it’s even longer!)

You can create quite a bit of influence in even a month—and most of a manuscript. You don’t need to write a full-length book to become an author. You can write a short ebook. If you write 30 posts during National Book Blogging Month (NaBoBloMo), and if each one is 500 words long, you will produce a 15,000-word ebook. That’s not shabby! Write 750-word posts, and you’ll have 22,500 words by the end of April. That’s a solid book, if not a full-length book. You can even write 1,000 words per post just three days per week and end up with about 12,000 words.

And if you share these posts on all your social networks, you will begin to be seen as an influencer. You see, it’s all about providing valuable content on a consistent and regular basis. Do that with your blog. Then publish the book you blogged. You’ll be an authority blogger and an expert author.

Boom! Influencer.

By using your social networking skills well, blogging content that matters—that people want to read and share, and by publishig a book, you soon will find people paying attention to you in different way. Even if you never become the type of influencer with huge clout, you can achieve a great deal of authority in you own respective field or circle—online and off. Your blog and a blogged book will help you accomplish that quickly.

NaBoBloMoTell your friends about National Book Blogging Month! Share this post or the image to the left. Let’s get more people blogging books!

The post Become an Influencer with a Blog and a Book appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>
http://howtoblogabook.com/how-to-become-an-influencer-online-and-off/feed/ 0
Share Your Wisdom by Blogging a Bookhttp://howtoblogabook.com/share-your-wisdom-by-blogging-a-book/ http://howtoblogabook.com/share-your-wisdom-by-blogging-a-book/#respond Tue, 14 Apr 2015 15:00:00 +0000 http://howtoblogabook.com/?p=5493 You’ve begun blogging a short book (or even a long book). Or maybe you decided to blog to build platform for a forthcoming book, to promote a previously released book, or simply to express yourself. You had a lot of momentum when you started, and now… suddenly, you’ve begun to wonder: Do I really have […]

The post Share Your Wisdom by Blogging a Book appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>
Photo courtesy of tashatuvango | stockfresh.com
Photo courtesy of tashatuvango | stockfresh.com

You’ve begun blogging a short book (or even a long book). Or maybe you decided to blog to build platform for a forthcoming book, to promote a previously released book, or simply to express yourself. You had a lot of momentum when you started, and now… suddenly, you’ve begun to wonder: Do I really have anything to write about that is worth reading?

It could be that a lack of unique visitors (readers) to your site spawned this negative thought, or you might have low self-esteem in general. Maybe a reader left an unkind comment on a post.

The reason doesn’t matter. Now you have so-called writer’s block. You’re afraid to blog because you think you have nothing worthwhile to share.

Poppycock.

Everyone Has Wisdom to Share

If you have life or work experience, you have something to share. If you happen to be an expert or authority in a subject area, you have something to share. If you are passionate about a topic or cause, or if you have a hobby or skill, you have something to share.

Someone wants to know how to keep rosebushes alive. Someone else wants to learn how to remain married for 50 years, make money on the stock market, start an online business, raise successful kids, foster dogs, or knit unique sweaters. No matter what you know, you can transform someone’s life with that knowledge.

And, it’s your responsibility to share what you know to others. The Jewish mystics, or Kabbalists, teach that you stand on a particular step on the path to fulfillment or completion. Call it consciousness,  higher learning or even “connection” if you like. There are others above and below you. When you teach what you know, which, in this case, equates to sharing your wisdom via your blog posts, you move up a step. That makes room for the person behind you to move up a step as well, and it pushes the person above you to share his wisdom and move up a step as well. If you don’t share what you know, you remain stuck on the same step—and you restrict the movement of those around you.

I tell you this story to impress upon you the fact that you must share your wisdom. It’s your purpose. Not only that, the world needs what you know. Even if you end up with a small group of readers, they benefit from your knowledge. In fact, not every blogger attracts thousands of readers per month or day. Many have just hundreds of readers per month. But those readers’ lives are transformed by the bloggers’ words they read in posts each day or week.

Rediscover Your Wisdom

At this point in your project if you feel like you are floundering and lacking the expertise to continue blogging your book, try this exercise:

Make a list of all your accomplishments to date that relate to your blogged book’s subject matter. Or, as I did in this post, just list facts about your career. Include everything you can think of from the time you were quite young until the present day.

When you run out of items to add to the list, go back through the list and highlight your accomplishments—big and small.

The information garnered during this exercise should bolster your confidence and provide you with “signature stories.” These are the primary stories you share when asked by journalists about your writing journey. However, you also can write about them in posts. They provide wonderful anecdotes or vignettes to illustrate your points and your expertise.

When you complete your list, pat yourself on the back! Acknowledge your knowledge and authority. Celebrate it!

Then get back to writing. You can start writing some of those signature stories. Add them to your book or your blog posts. Let the world know what you know: You are an expert, and you have something valuable to share via your written words.

Share Beyond Your Blog

And don’t be shy! Bloggers gain readers by sharing their posts on social networks. You can’t just assume readers will discover your blog if you write consistently and regularly. Yes, that practice will get your posts cataloged by Google and other search engines, and eventually it will drive your posts and your site up in the search engine results pages (SERPs). But it is not enough. You need to let potential readers know you’ve published a post, and you need them to share your posts as well.

So share you posts, and make it easy for others to do the same. (Include social sharing tools underneath every blog post.)

Here’s a great blogpost from Coschedule.com that will help you learn how to share your posts, your blogged book and your wisdom effectively.

NaBoBloMoTell your friends about National Book Blogging Month! Share this post or the image to the left. Let’s get more people blogging books!

The post Share Your Wisdom by Blogging a Book appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>
http://howtoblogabook.com/share-your-wisdom-by-blogging-a-book/feed/ 0
4 Tips for Finding Viable Blogged-Book Subjectshttp://howtoblogabook.com/4-tips-for-finding-viable-blogged-book-subjects/ http://howtoblogabook.com/4-tips-for-finding-viable-blogged-book-subjects/#respond Thu, 09 Apr 2015 07:27:18 +0000 http://howtoblogabook.com/?p=5495 You want to blog a book…fast. After all, it’s National Book Blogging Month (NaBoBloMo). But you are making slow progress because you can’t decide upon a book topic. Without a subject, you can’t write. NaBoBloMo only provides the impetus for you to do what you’ve meant to do for a long time. The challenge asks […]

The post 4 Tips for Finding Viable Blogged-Book Subjects appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>
find subjects for a blogged book
©allapen – Fotolia.com

You want to blog a book…fast. After all, it’s National Book Blogging Month (NaBoBloMo). But you are making slow progress because you can’t decide upon a book topic. Without a subject, you can’t write.

NaBoBloMo only provides the impetus for you to do what you’ve meant to do for a long time. The challenge asks that you complete a book project that makes you an author, strengthens your brand, builds your mailing list, or boosts your business. To achieve this goal, you do, indeed, need to determine what to write about. How do you do so? Here are four tips.

Tip #1: Determine your goal or purpose.

What are you trying to accomplish by writing a book? Knowing this can lead you to the topic of your book.

For example, if you want to build your business, focus your book on the interests of your customers and clients. If you want to build your email list, create an ebook that provides an irresistible offer—something your readers or clients gladly will trade their email address to receive. If you want to begin a career as a professional speaker, write a book related the topic of your speech; make that book long enough to print so you can sell it at the back of the room.

Tip #2: Focus on a Target Market

You must know who your reader is. Have you created what many marketing experts call an “avatar,” a profile of the person you want to reach with your message? If not, do this and pay attention to your description. It will lead you to book topics.

The more you know about you ideal reader, the better equipped you become to write a book that targets that reader (or customer). As you discover your readers’ likes and dislikes, problems, questions, pain points, interests, and needs, you uncover potential book topics. A viable book subject solves readers’ problems, answers readers’ question, eases readers’ pain, or addresses readers’ interests, needs and desires.

Focus on providing your target market with the benefits they seek, and you’ll have ideas for a viable book.

Tip #3: Uncover Your Knowledge Base

There’s a bit of wisdom that gets tossed around a lot in writing circles: Write about what you know. Take this advice if you seek a topic for your book.

Make a list of your areas of expertise, experience and knowledge. If you are also passionate about these subjects, they make great subjects for books—especially if a lot of other people are also interested in or passionate about them.

Tip #4: Follow Your Heart

If you simply want to start blogging or writing, and you care less about how many readers (or buyers) and clients you attract to the final product (your book) than you do about the joy of writing, just follow your heart. Trust your intuition. Combine your passion and your sense of purpose or mission. This action will lead you to a book you want to blog. Even if no one reads it (and someone surely will), you’ll feel good about sharing your words with the world. And sometimes that’s enough.

In the blogosphere often successful blogs are born out of someone’s passion and purpose, which leads to an inspired idea. They pursue that idea…and the readers follow. Often these blogs are “discovered” by agents or publishers as well and turned into books. The same could happen to you.

Do you have another tip to add to the list? Leave it for me in a comment below.

NaBoBloMoTell your friends about National Book Blogging Month! Share this post or the image to the left. Let’s get more people blogging books!

The post 4 Tips for Finding Viable Blogged-Book Subjects appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>
http://howtoblogabook.com/4-tips-for-finding-viable-blogged-book-subjects/feed/ 0
How to Speak Your Blogged Bookhttp://howtoblogabook.com/how-to-speak-your-blogged-book/ http://howtoblogabook.com/how-to-speak-your-blogged-book/#respond Tue, 07 Apr 2015 07:15:00 +0000 http://howtoblogabook.com/?p=5458 Many entrepreneurs don’t believe they are writers. However, they want to become authors or bloggers because they know a book and a blog give them expert status. Indeed, becoming an authority or thought leader in your industry will help you grow your businesses. But if you don’t think you can write, this leaves you in […]

The post How to Speak Your Blogged Book appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>
speak your blogged book
Photo courtesy of Flynt|StockFresh.com

Many entrepreneurs don’t believe they are writers. However, they want to become authors or bloggers because they know a book and a blog give them expert status. Indeed, becoming an authority or thought leader in your industry will help you grow your businesses. But if you don’t think you can write, this leaves you in a quandary. You want and need a book and a blog but don’t feel you can write it.

If you are one of these business owners, stop stressing! If you can speak, you can write. And if you can speak about your business, you can write a book—or maintain a blog—that helps generate increased income. Better yet, if you can speak about the issues your customers and clients most often want you to solve or the questions they most often want you to answer, you can write a book and blog posts that attract more customers and clients, thereby boosting your business’s bottom line.

How is that possible? You can speak your book. You also can speak your blog posts.

Let’s focus on how you speak a blogged book. Keep in mind that the same principles apply to writing blog posts on a continuing basis.

Don’t Bother with a Ghost

Most people who believe they can’t write turn to ghostwriters. I get at least one call per month from someone who wants to know if I’ll ghostwrite a book for them or recommend a ghostwriter who will. I always tell them I don’t recommend this option. Here’s why:

  • Ghostwriters are enormously expensive.
  • Ghostwriters don’t know your business.
  • Ghostwriters don’t have your knowledge or experience.
  • Ghostwriting takes a lot of time and energy.
  • Ghostwritten books don’t end up sounding like you.

5 Steps to Speaking Your Blogged Book

Instead, I recommend an alternative option that I use successfully with my clients. I tell these aspiring authors to speak their books. This method is easy, quick and affordable, and it produces a book filled with their own knowledge—experience told in their voice and with their language.

If you need to speak, rather than write, your book, here are the exact steps I use with my clients to get their books out of their heads and onto paper—without them hardly typing a word.

  1. Mind map the idea. Start by brainstorming the book idea. You may have only a general topic, but work until you fine-tune this to a subject and an angle. Conclude the exercise with you can create a table of contents. This provides you with the basic structure for your book. (To learn more about how to go through a mind mapping process to start your book, read this post.)
  2. Create a detailed table of contents. (I discuss this in the mind-mapping post as well.) Continue brainstorming, or mind mapping, until you have more content. Take all the smaller topics you conceived during the mind-mapping process and place them in the appropriate chapter in your table of content. These might end up as subheadings in your chapter, and you can set them up as such in your table of contents. Also, create bullet points under each subheading to remind you of the topics you want discuss. Take the time to make notes, if necessary, on each chapter, subheading, bullet point, or topic so you know what you want to say for each one. The point is to get as detailed as possible (without writing the book). Think of this like a PowerPoint presentation; you need enough information so your memory is sparked and you know what to say, but you don’t necessarily want to write everything out in sentences and paragraphs.
  3. Speak your book chapter by chapter. Using the detailed table of contents, speak your book into a digital recorder.
  4. Get your recordings transcribed. Hire a transcriptionist to take your audio recordings and turn them into a Word document. Or use MS Word’s dictation system or a program like Dragon Naturally Speaking as you record your book. This avoids the cost of transcription.
  5. Edit your transcripts. Tackle your manuscript once yourself before hiring an editor. This step saves you money. It gives you the chance to ensure what you said made sense. It’s amazing how what we say often is incomprehensible. Once you’ve done this, send it on to a professional book editor for a round or two (or three) of developmental editing and then a round of line editing.

Final Tip for Speaking Your Book

Here’s one more tip: If step #3, speaking your book chapter by chapter, feels awkward to you, turn your detailed table of contents into questions. Then have someone interview you. Record your answers into a recorder, and follow the rest of the steps.

When you’ve completed all the steps, you will have produced a full manuscript. How much editing that document needs varies, but if you’ve planned out your book in fine detail—the more detail the better—and stuck to that detail as you spoke your book, it should be in good shape. You also need to have created a sound book structure in those early stages. If you didn’t, a developmental editor will find many reasons to move content around and make other major changes. (If you need help with your book structure or content, hire a book coach to help you.)

Once editing is complete, your book is ready for cover design and interior design, if you want a print book, and proofreading. Then you can publish and start boosting your business as an author as well as an entrepreneur.

Use this same process once you’ve finished blogging your book. Speak your posts to help you write, publish and promote your book and your business on a regular and consistent basis.

You’ll never again say you aren’t a writer!

NaBoBloMoAre you participating in National Book Blogging Month? If so, leave a comment below about your project and progress. Or tell me why you want to blog a book.

The post How to Speak Your Blogged Book appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>
http://howtoblogabook.com/how-to-speak-your-blogged-book/feed/ 0
How to Get Organized to Blog a Nonfiction Bookhttp://howtoblogabook.com/how-to-get-organized-to-blog-a-nonfiction-book/ http://howtoblogabook.com/how-to-get-organized-to-blog-a-nonfiction-book/#respond Thu, 02 Apr 2015 07:25:27 +0000 http://howtoblogabook.com/?p=5454 The majority of bloggers and writers who come to me for help don’t lack ideas. They struggle to find the organize skills that help them turn their ideas into books and blog. Indeed, organization can prove a challenging task for creative people. If you are like me, your desk often becomes a jumble of papers, […]

The post How to Get Organized to Blog a Nonfiction Book appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>

learn to organize your bookThe majority of bloggers and writers who come to me for help don’t lack ideas. They struggle to find the organize skills that help them turn their ideas into books and blog. Indeed, organization can prove a challenging task for creative people. If you are like me, your desk often becomes a jumble of papers, sticky notes and books. (Your computer files are often just as disorganized as your physical file cabinets.)

When I settle down to write or to blog a nonfiction book, however, I force myself to get organized. This is especially true if I want to do it quickly, like when I have a deadline or I take on a challenge such as National Book Blogging Month (NaBoBLoMo).

Nonfiction books can entail a fair amount of research and detail. Keeping all of this material arranged in a systematic way is important, especially if you don’t want to stop writing or blogging to find research, facts or details. Yet, sometimes you need that information to write! Organization becomes essential if you want to blog a book in a month (or less), or if you simply want to get it done as efficiently and quickly as possible.

6 Tools for Organizing a Nonfiction Book

Luckily, there’s an organizational tool for just about every writer’s style. Here’s a list of six such tools from which to choose. One should fit your needs.

  1. write a nonfiction bookPiles. If you like to copy or print your research, or you find yourself tearing out articles from newspapers and magazines, you are a perfect candidate for the pile method. Simply start sorting through all your “research,” and placing it in piles that seem related by subject matter. (Hopefully, you can at least find all your research.) When you are done, you will have a variety of piles, each one likely related to a particular chapter in your book. If you like, you can leave your piles neatly sorted in a place where no one will bother them. Or you can put them in labeled folders.
  2. Folders. Online or off, folders represent the second easiest way to organize your work or research. You can place your research or printed draft chapters (or snippets of writing) in physical manila folders or even an accordion folder. You can also place it in a three-ring binder. Today, there are many types of nifty folders to purchase. Online, it’s easy to create folders on your computer for a specific project or to store them in the cloud using Dropbox or some other program, like Evernote (see below).
  3. organize a blogged bookCards. If you are one of those people who like to write everything down by hand, you may like the 3” x 5” card method. Today, you can get these cards spiral bound or in perforated little tablets so you can carry them with you easily. This allows you to write down all your ideas and then file them later. You can place them in a special card box, which is a really nice way to organize a book project, especially if you get dividers to separate your chapters.
  4. Evernote. If you are more technology oriented, Evernote is a cool program that synchs your smartphone with your computer or tablet. You can easily add your own notes, clip web pages and articles, and place them all in a “Notebook” for your book project. Within that notebook you can create many different “notes.” All of it is saved in the “cloud.” As you write your manuscript, you can save this to Evernote as a backup as well.
  5. book in a binderBinders . If you like the idea of a binder, but you don’t want to store everything online, purchase an actual three-ring binder and some inserts with numbers or pockets. Use these to separate chapters and to hold some of your research. Print your manuscript as you write, punch it with three holes, and “build a book” as you compose.
  6. Scrivener. This computer program allows you to upload all sorts of research as well as to create your manuscript (or upload your existing manuscript), and to then organize it—all in one program. If you like the card system, you’ll love this, because it has a bit of that as well—cards attached to cork boards allowing you to visually move your information around and to file things in folders. If you like folders and binders, this is for you as well. The folders appear to exist in a large binder, almost like old Trapper Keepers. Many writers say this program revolutionizes their writing process.

Write Continuously

A disorganized project can lead to disorganized thoughts and disorganized writing…and a lot of time spent looking for what you need. Believe me…I know. It can stop your fingers in their tracks, which means you won’t blog your book in a month or by whatever deadline you choose.

That’s why I recommend going through the process of creating a business plan for your book prior to writing as well. It hones your idea, helps you get clear on what goes in each chapter of your nonfiction book, and focuses your writing not only on the subject at hand but on what your reader needs and wants, which makes your book marketable.

Creating a business plan serves as an important organizational step. During the process, you’ll discover what additional research or material you might need for your book to make it unique and necessary in its category and market.

Take the time to get organized first, and then write your nonfiction book. You’ll find the process goes much more smoothly if you do.

Don’t Forget to Organize Your Time and Space

It’s just as important to organize your time and space as the material for your book. You will find it hard to write a book amidst the clutter on your desk and without a specific time allotted to writing each day or week.

Clear out a space for your research, so it is close at hand. Unclutter your desk, which helps you think clearly and stay undistracted. And mark off time on your calendar, preferably daily, for writing periods of 30 minutes to an hour or more in length.

Organizing your time may mean organizing your life. It could mean getting a sitter, getting up earlier or staying up later, or asking a friend to take your dog for a walk. Figure out strategies to free up time.

Your Book-Blogging Checklist

To write or blog a nonfiction book, you also need to complete a variety of tasks. Some are simple. Some are more complex. Many writers never get started simply because they don’t know where to start. The overall idea of writing or blogging a book seems too overwhelming. That’s why it’s best to chunk blogging a book down into smaller tasks and organize those into a to-do list or check list. This also helps you write your book fast in a short time frame, such as during NaBoBloMo.

Use the following as a basic checklist to get started blogging your book—and complete it by the end of this month (or your own deadline).

  1. Set your intention. It’s important to declare to yourself—and possibly to others—that you intent do write a book and by when. You might even want to write a note to yourself that says, “I, __(name)__, intend to write my book, ___(title)____. I will begin on __(date)__ and finish on __(date)__.” Then sign and date this.
  2. Select your topic. I’ve covered this earlier. Pick a topic you feel passionate about and that serves a specific and sizeable market. It should also be unique and necessary in its bookstore category.
  3. Give your book a working title. You can finalize this later, when you have finished your book or after #7.
  4. Create a business plan for your book. To do this, using a book proposal as a template and evaluate the information you compile to determine how to make your idea as marketable as possible. I call this going through the Author Training Process, and I describe it in detail in The Author Training Manual. Evaluate your idea for marketability. Tweak your topic, angle and title as necessary.
  5. Summarize your book. Write a pitch, a list of benefits and a one-paragraph synopsis of your book.
  6. Create a table of contents. Decide on both the structure and the content of your book.
  7. Detail your contents. Write chapter-by-chapter synopsis. Know what content will be included in each chapter.
  8. Gather your information. Do your research. Collect the necessary books. Have everything close at hand. Conduct interviews.
  9. Write your first draft. Write…don’t edit.
  10. Do a round or two of self-editing, then hand your manuscript off to a developmental editor. After that, have it read by a line or copy editor and a proofreader.

Now, you are organized! You have no excuses. Go blog your book! (And consider doing so during National Book Blogging Month!)

NaBoBloMoAre you participating in National Book Blogging Month? If so, leave a comment below about your project and progress. Or tell me why you want to blog a book.

The post How to Get Organized to Blog a Nonfiction Book appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>
http://howtoblogabook.com/how-to-get-organized-to-blog-a-nonfiction-book/feed/ 0
Blog Your Book in a Monthhttp://howtoblogabook.com/blog-your-book-in-a-month/ http://howtoblogabook.com/blog-your-book-in-a-month/#comments Tue, 31 Mar 2015 07:15:00 +0000 http://howtoblogabook.com/?p=5456 It’s that time of year again: National Book Blogging Month (NaBoBloMo). No…that doesn’t mean I am suggesting that you review books on your blog for a month. Indeed, bloggers who review books call themselves book bloggers, but I’m talking about writing a book on your blog—in 30 days. You can be that kind of book […]

The post Blog Your Book in a Month appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>

NaBoBloMo

It’s that time of year again: National Book Blogging Month (NaBoBloMo). No…that doesn’t mean I am suggesting that you review books on your blog for a month. Indeed, bloggers who review books call themselves book bloggers, but I’m talking about writing a book on your blog—in 30 days. You can be that kind of book blogger by partipating in NaBoBloMo. Game?

Prepare for NaBoBloMo 2015

If so, gear up by following these steps:

  1. Come up with a topic you can blog about for 30 days or several times a week for a month. This should be a topic that lends itself to a short book.
  2. Create a content plan that includes material you will publish on the blog as well as new material for the finished e-book book. For example, blog all but one chapter, or plan to write an introduction and a conclusion for the finished version.
  3. Break your content into blog-post sized pieces—300-500 word chunks or whatever length will work to publish posts two to seven times per week for 30 days.
  4. Create a blogging schedule and stick to it for the next month. Decide how often you will blog or need to blog to complete your book and on what days.

How to Blog a Book in a Month

If you don’t normally find the time to blog often or consistently, here’s a tip: Schedule time on your calendar for writing posts. To successfully complete NaBoBloMo, you need to sacrifice some other activities—like television watching, reading, and lunch with friends. This will open up the hours you need in your week to write the additional posts. If your weekdays are quite busy, you may need to set aside one day on the weekend to knock out three or four posts and then schedule them to publish later. (Hopefully, this will help you develop the discipline to continue writing more regularly after NaBoBloMo.)

Don’t make the mistake of writing all your posts in WordPress only. Instead, create a manuscript in a word processing program. Write your posts in MS Word, Scrivener or Pages. Then copy and past the individual posts into WordPress. In this way you create a full manuscript to edit at the end of April. This also serves as a back up.

Stay focused on your book! Don’t go off on a tangent and write about something else. Use your content, or blog, plan, which should tell you what subject to write about and publish on each day. Don’t waver.

Don’t feel overwhelmed. Remember, a blogged book can be short. It can be comprised of a series of 10 to 30 posts. And to publish an e-book on Kindle, you need only about 4,500 words. That’s only 15 posts if you average 300 words per post.

That said, if you really want to blog a full-length book in a month, you can. If you publish three posts per day, each one averaging 500 words (or one 1,500-word post), you’ll complete a 45,000-word manuscript by the end of April. You can then add an additional chapter, an intro and a conclusion; this might amount to another 5,000 words. A 50,000-word book is a respectable length for a nonfiction book.

How to Particpate in NaBoBloMo

NaBoBloMo is a personal challenge. You won’t find a forum here on howtoblogabook.com or any special events. You don’t need to check in, register or report on word or post counts.

If you want to declare your goal so you have accountability, please do leave a comment below stating the fact that you are participating in NaBoBloMo. Describe your blogged book, and include your blog URL so others can read it. Feel free to come back and comment again on this post or any other post during the month to provide an update on your book blogging progress. And read the posts this month, which will pertain to blogging books fast.

The post Blog Your Book in a Month appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>
http://howtoblogabook.com/blog-your-book-in-a-month/feed/ 4
Coming Soon: The Second Edition of How to Blog a Book!http://howtoblogabook.com/coming-soon-the-second-edition-of-how-to-blog-a-book/ http://howtoblogabook.com/coming-soon-the-second-edition-of-how-to-blog-a-book/#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 07:30:16 +0000 http://howtoblogabook.com/?p=5444 Back in May 2012, I first held a copy of How to Blog a Book in my hands. I felt so thrilled that my “experiment” had worked: I had blogged a book and blogged my way to a book deal. I had proven that you could consciously write, publish and promote your book one post […]

The post Coming Soon: The Second Edition of How to Blog a Book! appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>

expanded and updated edition of How to Blog a BookBack in May 2012, I first held a copy of How to Blog a Book in my hands. I felt so thrilled that my “experiment” had worked: I had blogged a book and blogged my way to a book deal. I had proven that you could consciously write, publish and promote your book one post at a time and attract both readers and publishers in the process.

My Book’s Success

In the past three years, How to Blog a Book has been one of Writer’s Digest Books bestselling titles. Not only that, upon release the book made it onto three Amazon Top 100 lists and has remained there for 34 months.

Sure, there have been a few days when the book was not on any Amazon list, but for the majority of that three-year period How to Blog a Book has been an Amazon bestseller.

Not only that, How to Blog a Book earned back it’s advance in less than six months. That means the publisher and I both made money on the book within that amount of time. The publisher also reprinted in less than 12 months. The book was featured on end caps in Barnes and Noble that first holiday season, and a second print run just six or seven months after release ensured no stores ran out of copies.

Additionally, Writer’s Digest Books gets few returns for How to Blog a Book, which means the bookstores sell the copies and don’t need to send them back. In fact, the publisher once called me “a Spiderman among authors” because my book is “sticky.”

Sales Leads to Opportunity

I guess I could have just rested on my laurels… But my book’s success—it’s consistent sales—provided me with a new opportunity. Less than two years after the book’s initial release, the publisher asked me if I wanted to produce a second edition of How to Blog a Book. Of course, I said, “Yes!”

Which brings me to my point… (No, I wasn’t just bragging!)

I am proud to announce that this June 2015, Writer’s Digest Books will release the revised and expanded second edition of How to Blog a Book.

The Most-Comprehensive Guide for Bloggers and Authors

Although I was proud of the first edition, I’m even more proud of the second edition. This book is the most-comprehensive guide to bogging a book or booking a blog available today. Besides the great information contained in the first edition of How to Blog a Book—information on how to consciously set out to write a book on your blog—the book now contains an entire chapter for bloggers who want to repurpose existing blog content into a book, content not written with a book in mind.

Plus, I’ve updated all the technical blogging information, included more ways to go blog to book, and added four blog-to-book success stories. (The previous success stories were all from bloggers who booked their blogs.)

How to Blog a Book, the expanded and revised second edition, provides all the information you need to:

  • start a blog
  • blog a book
  • book a blog
  • promote your blog and book
  • build a business around your blog

More and more authors and bloggers choose to use their blogs as a means to write books and to self-publish them. I’ve written about how you can turn your blog into a book production machine.

And agents and publishers continue to consider high-traffic blogs as successfully test marketed book ideas. The blog-to-book trend has never dwindled.

The Reviews are In!

Here are some early reviews for the revised and expanded second edition of How to Blog a Book:

“If you always wanted to write that next book, but only have time to blog, then read Nina’s book! You too can become an author.”
Michael Stelzner, Founder of Social Media Examiner, Author of Launch.

“If you dread the thought of starting or maintaining a blog, and balancing it with the stresses of writing a book, How to Blog a Book could well be the most valuable book you’ve discovered this year. Nina Amir gives you a toolbox of shortcuts, tricks and workarounds that will save you money, time and sanity.  Follow her easy-to-understand guide (even for non-techies!) and you’ll create a blog your fans love and a book that they’ll promote for you.”
Joan Stewart, The Publicity Hound, PublicityHound.com

“Nina Amir shows you—no, actually implores you—to write your book on your blog in a painless, effortless way. Learn ‘how’ and ‘why’ you ‘can’ and ‘should’ write your book from your blog posts. How to Blog a Book 2nd Edition provides the road map to go from publishing a blog to publishing YOUR BOOK.”
Scott Lorenz, Westwind Book Marketing, Book-Marketing-Expert.com

If you are looking for the ultimate “blogging-for-authors” book or “authoring-for bloggers” book, you want a copy of the revised and expanded second edition of How to Blog a Book.

Watch this blog and my newsletter for news about the release. To address requests for continuing education around blogging books and to solve some technical issues related to this process, I plan to develop several new products, courses and services in conjunction with the release of How to Blog a Book (2nd Ed.). If you want to be the first to hear about these opportunities, join my mailing list.

In the meantime, if you want help blogging your book or booking your blog, take advantage of my March Madness special. Save $200 on my blog coaching services if you sign up this month using this link before the end of the month: http://bit.ly/blogmarchmadness

CLEARANCE(9)

The post Coming Soon: The Second Edition of How to Blog a Book! appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>
http://howtoblogabook.com/coming-soon-the-second-edition-of-how-to-blog-a-book/feed/ 1
Lizzie Skurnick on Going from Blog to Book: Shelf Discoveryhttp://howtoblogabook.com/lizzie-skurnick-on-going-from-blog-to-book-shelf-discovery/ http://howtoblogabook.com/lizzie-skurnick-on-going-from-blog-to-book-shelf-discovery/#respond Tue, 24 Mar 2015 07:05:51 +0000 http://howtoblogabook.com/?p=5465 Lizzie Skurnick’s blog-to-book success came from her regular Jezebel.com feature column, Fine Lines. This blog consists of her meditations on favorite, old-school YA (young adult) novels from the late ‘60s to the early ‘80s—books much beloved by now-grown-up women. Skurnick says, “The book resembles the blog, but I added twice as many columns and organized […]

The post Lizzie Skurnick on Going from Blog to Book: Shelf Discovery appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>

shelfdiscovery coverLizzie Skurnick’s blog-to-book success came from her regular Jezebel.com feature column, Fine Lines. This blog consists of her meditations on favorite, old-school YA (young adult) novels from the late ‘60s to the early ‘80s—books much beloved by now-grown-up women.

Skurnick says, “The book resembles the blog, but I added twice as many columns and organized and edited them into schools of thought for the reader.”

It was published by Avon in July 2009.

Why did you begin blogging?

I began blogging in 2003, just when literary blogs were coming into existence. I was working as a freelance cultural journalist, but I saw that other people were having the literary conversations online that I didn’t have a space to publish in print, and I wanted to join in.

How did you choose your topic?

Blogging with a purpose in mind is less rewarding then blogging out of enthusiasm. It’s one of the few media that thrives on your individual obsessions and your true writing voice, in which you can wax on about arcane bits of knowledge that would never have a go in print. So I was free to venture off into discourses on Roald Dahl’s adult stories; poems based on current book deals; posts in which I asked my audience to find a word to describe a typical writers’ complaint. (Our winner for the annoyance of seeing an enemy publish a book: “Penvy.”)

Since I didn’t have to prove to an editor their audience would enjoy my work, I was free to develop my own audience, who also had their own esoterica they pursued and I loved to see.

What, if any, market research did you do before beginning your blog?

I didn’t need to do any market research. I knew quite well that my group of friends and the larger group of bookhounds my age had read all the books from the ‘70s and ‘80s for girls and loved and valued them but that nobody had ever taken the time to write about them en masse before. I think market research violates the essential tenet of blogging, which is that your enthusiasm, creativity and fine work will find an audience if they deserve one. It’s a place for purists and enthusiasts, not opportunists.

That said, when my blog did become a book, I was often frustrated by how my publisher marketed it. They did very little to learn about the large audience I already had and wanted to sell it to their own audience, who’d never expressed an interest. It was lazy of them, and it wasn’t until a second publicity team came on that loved and understood the book that the publisher really joined forces with me in linking the web lovers into print.

Did you think you were writing a book, did you plan on blogging a book, or were you simply blogging on your topic? (In retrospect, would doing one or the other have made it easier to later write your book?)

I was simply blogging on the topic, but when I began I was fairly sure a publisher would want it. (After all, it’s a book about books.) It also had an enthusiastic audience, and it had never been done before. In fact the publisher pursued me; I never sent out a proposal prior to that, and I already had an agent who’d followed me since the early days of my blog who I asked to represent me on the deal.

How long did it take for you to gain blog readers, and can you pinpoint any certain event that created a tipping point when readership increased noticeably?

I’d always had a devoted, good-sized readership, but I really lucked out to have my column featured on Jezebel.com, a new blog for women my age. They had an enormous readership already so I was free to develop my own fans there.

I would have been able to work up interest in the column on my own, but it would have taken much, much longer, and been much more work on my part. Also I had a wonderful editor at Jezebel.com who believed in the project and supported the feature wholeheartedly, which is priceless to a writer.

What did you do to drive traffic (readers) to your blog?

I didn’t do anything! I wrote about what I enjoyed, and I had conversations online with other bloggers who were also writing about things I was interested in.

How did your blog-to-book deal come about?

A few editors at HarperCollins contacted me, I contacted the agent I knew from the old days, I wrote a proposal, and we inked the deal.

What one or two things that you did would you attribute to your blogging success (and to the book deal you landed)?

One thing bloggers should do is be consistent, which is why blogging on something you’re enthusiastic about is important. You don’t get a book deal from a concept—you already have a concept, something you’ve been wanting to shape into a larger project for years. If you’re passionate about something, it’s easy to find others who’ll share your passion, especially if you’re also a clever, funny writer, or if you’re doing important, original work. So I would discourage people from trying to shape their ideas before they’ve even blogged. If it’s not something you’re compelled to do already, it’s probably not anything you could take far enough into a large blog project and then a book.

What advice would you give to writers wanting to blog a book (and build readership/platform while doing so)?

Choose a project you love, something you’ve always wanted to do. And if it doesn’t take, don’t feel too bad. Maybe you’re not a blogger. It’s not like blog-to-book deals are the only way to express your enthusiasms to a larger audience.

What’s the most important thing a blogger can do to get noticed in the blogosphere?

It’s less important to be noticed than it is for your project to have integrity and consistency and, one hopes, a degree of fun or novelty. Notice will follow. You can’t start by trying to be noticed. Blogging is like a dinner party. Being successfully social isn’t about trying to get attention at any cost; it’s about being yourself and appreciating others.

About the Author

Lizzie Skurnick head shotLizzie Skurnick is the columnist for Jezebel.com’s Fine Lines and the author of ten teen books in the Sweet Valley High, Love Stories and Alias series. Her literary blog, Old Hag, is a Forbes Best of the Web pick. She’s on the board of the National Book Critics Circle and has written on books and culture extensively for the New York Times Book Review, Times Sunday Styles, the LA Times, NPR.org, The Washington Post and many other publications. Her poetry has appeared everywhere from Morning Edition to the Iowa Review to New York magazine online, and she is the recipient of residencies or awards from Yaddo, the Ucross Foundation, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and the AWP. An expanded edition of her Pushcart Prize-nominated chapbook of poetry, Check-In, was released by Caketrain Books in 2009. She lives in Jersey City.

The post Lizzie Skurnick on Going from Blog to Book: Shelf Discovery appeared first on How to Blog a Book.

]]>
http://howtoblogabook.com/lizzie-skurnick-on-going-from-blog-to-book-shelf-discovery/feed/ 0